Saturday, January 19, 2008

Relationship between clinical–radiographic evaluation and outcome of teeth replantation

Adriana de Jesus Soares, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida Gomes, Alexandre Augusto Zaia, Caio Cezar Randi Ferraz, Francisco José de Souza-Filho
Relationship between clinical-radiographic evaluation and outcome of teeth replantation
Dental Traumatology (OnlineEarly Articles).
doi:10.1111/j.1600-9657.2007.00528.x

Abstract – The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic results related to avulsed and replanted teeth in patients who sought treatment at the Dental Trauma Center of the Dental School of Piracicaba, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. One hundred replanted teeth were studied from 48 individuals (18 females and 30 males, with a mean age of 15 years and 9 months). Post-replantation factors (clinical and radiographic) were observed. The clinical aspects evaluated were crown discoloration, pulp necrosis, mobility changes, presence of fistulae and tooth infra-position. Radiographic examination aimed to identify replacement and inflammatory root resorptions, pulp canal obliteration and the presence of radiolucent areas. Depending on clinical and radiographic findings, results were classified as: complete success, acceptable success, uncertain success or failure. During anamnesis, other factors such as stage of root formation, period extra-alveolar, storage medium, type of splintation, and period after replantation time were recorded. The data obtained were statistically analyzed in order to determine the relationship between the post-replantation factors and outcome of teeth replantation. Linear logistic regression revealed that the majority of replanted teeth were associated with root resorptions and its occurrence duplicated proportionally as the time after replantation increased. Based on these findings, replantation procedures must be submitted to an accurate follow-up, as the success of replanted teeth, which already tends to be limited, may be even more jeopardized if cases are not controlled.

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